Different Tones Of Essays By Francis

Francis Bacon had many accomplishments. He was a scientist, a philosopher, and a politician, and he was adept, too, at taking bribes; for this he had been imprisoned. It is, however, as a literary man that he is perhaps best remembered, a writer so competent with the pen that for decades there have been some persons willing to argue that Bacon wrote the plays attributed to William Shakespeare.

The essay form is rare in the modern age, although there are some faint signs of its revival. As Bacon used it, the essay is a carefully fashioned statement, both informative and expressive, by which a person comments on life and manners, on nature and its puzzles. The essay is not designed to win people to a particular cause or to communicate factual matter better put in scientific treatises. Perhaps that is one reason why it is not so popular in an age in which the truth of claims and their practical importance are always questioned.

The Essays first appeared, ten in number, in 1597. They were immediately popular because they were brief, lively, humane, and well-written. Perhaps they were effective in contrast to the rambling, florid prose written by most writers of the time. A considerable part of their charm lay in their civilized tone. In these essays, Bacon reveals himself as an inquisitive but also an appreciative man with wit enough to interest others. The first edition contained the following essays: “Of Studies,” “Of Discourse,” “Of Ceremonies and Respects,” “Of Followers and Friends,” “Of Suitors,” “Of Expense,” “Of Regiment of Health,” “Of Honour and Reputation,” “Of Faction,” and “Of Negociating.”

By 1612, the number of essays had been increased to thirty-eight, the earlier ones having been revised or rewritten. By the last edition, in 1625, the number was fifty-eight. Comparison of the earlier essays with those written later shows not only a critical mind at work but also a man made sadder and wiser, or at least different, by changes in fortune.

The essays concern themselves with such universal concepts as truth, death, love, goodness, friendship, fortune, and praise. They cover such controversial matters as religion, atheism, “the True Greatness of Kingdoms and Estates,” custom and education, and usury, and they consider such intriguing matters as envy, cunning, innovations, suspicion, ambition, praise, vainglory, and the vicissitudes of things.

The Essays or Counsels, Civil and Moral, as they are called in the heading of the first essay, begins with an essay on truth entitled “Of Truth.” The title formula is always the same, simply a naming of the matter to be discussed, as, for example, “Of Death,” “Of Unity in Religion,” “Of Adversity,” “What is Truth? said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for an answer.” One expects a sermon, and one is pleasantly surprised. Bacon uses his theme as a point of departure for a discussion of the charms of lying, trying to fathom the love of lying for its own sake. “A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure,” he writes. This pleasure is ill-founded, however; it rests on error resulting from depraved judgment. Bacon reverses himself grandly: “ . . . truth, which only doth judge itself, teacheth that the inquiry of truth, which is the love-making or wooing of it, the knowledge of truth, which is the presence of it, and the belief of truth, which is the enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human nature.”

When it comes to death, Bacon begins by admitting that tales of death increase humanity’s natural fear of it, but he reminds the reader that death is not always painful. By references to Augustus Caesar, Tiberius, Vespasian, and others, Bacon shows that, even...

(The entire section is 1535 words.)

Essay Tips: Style Analysis - Tone of Voice Words

When you are writing a style analysis essay for an AP English Language or AP English Literature prompt you need to make sure that you use very specific words to describe the author's tone and attitude. Here are 80 tone and attitude words to spruce up your essays.

Tone and Attitude Words

1. angry
2. sarcastic
3. sweet
4. harsh
5. cheerful
6. pleasant
7. sharp
8. disgusted
9. haughty
10. soothing
11. melancholic
12. depressed
13. ecstatic
14. agitated
15. sympathetic
16. seductive
17. hollow
18. humorous
19. passive
20. persuasive
21. afraid
22. tired
23. happy
24. disappointed
25. dejected
26. excited
27. desperate
28. superficial
29. sad
30. artificial
31. authoritative
32. surprised
33. ironic
34. content
35. hurt
36. confused
37. questioning
38. inquisitive
39. arrogant
40. condescending
41. coarse
42. romantic
43. upset
44. paranoid
45. pleading
46. numb
47. cynical
48. facetious
49. hating
50. nervous
51. loving
52. scornful
53. enthusiastic
54. snooty
55. dreamy
56. lighthearted
57. humble
58. instructive
59. disinterested
60. uninterested
61. cheery
62. manipulative
63. contradictory
64. aggravated
65. serious
66. calm
67. proud
68. apathetic
69. encouraging
70. consoling
71. friendly
72. loud
73. brash
74. apologetic
75. appreciative
76. joyful
77. miserable
78. vibrant
79. whimsical
80. wistful


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Aboukhadijeh, Feross. "Essay Tips: Style Analysis - Tone of Voice Words" StudyNotes.org. Study Notes, LLC., 17 Nov. 2012. Web. 14 Mar. 2018. <https://www.apstudynotes.org/english/sample-essays/style-analysis-tone-of-voice-words/>.

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